Owen Logan & Edith Tudor-Hart

Karl-Marx-Hof, Vienna (Photographed about 1932)

About this artwork

The Karl-Marx-Hof was a fortress-like housing estate built by the Social Democrats between 1927 and 1930. A kilometre in length, its huge walls contained nearly 1400 apartments for Viennese workers. In her photograph of the building Tudor-Hart summons both its strength and sense of modernity. However, the permanence evoked by the architecture soon proved to be more apparent than real. In February 1934, during the short-lived Austrian civil war, the building was shelled by Austro-fascist forces. Out-gunned, and concerned about women and children still in their homes, the Karl-Marx-Hof’s defenders surrendered. The first mass movement against European fascism was easily defeated and the Austrian Social Democrats were driven into illegality and exile.

Owen Logan

Edith Tudor-Hart

Owen Logan

Owen Logan was born in Edinburgh in 1963. He has worked as a freelance photographer since 1979. His work has been largely about documenting other cultures. In 1983 he began a series of pictures of the Sikh community both in Britain and abroad. His projects have concentrated on life in Morocco, published as 'Al Maghrib' (1989) and the Italian communities in Scotland, 'Bloodlines/Vite allo Specchio'. He is currently working on a complex long-term project in Nigeria, about the impact of globalisation, which involves close collaboration with Nigerians. Logan is also a contributing editor to the independent arts magazine Variant and a research fellow in the field of socio-economics at the University of Aberdeen. He lives and works in Edinburgh and Toulon.

Edith Tudor-Hart

Edith Tudor-Hart, née Suschitzky, was one of the most significant documentary photographers working in Britain in the 1930s and 1940s. Born in Vienna, she grew up in radical Jewish circles. Edith married Alex Tudor-Hart, a British doctor, and the pair moved to England. There she worked as a documentary photographer, closely associated with the Communist Party, compiling a remarkable archive of images of working people in London and later, the south of Wales. Although still active in the 1950s, the difficulties of finding work as a woman photographer led eventually to Tudor-Hart abandoning photography altogether.