Owen Logan & Edith Tudor-Hart

May Day Gathering Outside the City Hall, Vienna (Photographed between 1930 and 1933)

About this artwork

May Day was the most important event in the urban calendar, a political festival on a mass scale that validated Vienna’s status as a socialist city. Marchers converged on the city centre, led by the powerful Austrian Social Democratic Party. Grandstands were erected outside Vienna’s City Hall for music and speeches, whilst the far smaller Austrian Communist Party staged a separate demonstration in front of the Votive Church nearby. However, as political tensions heightened May Day marches became an arena of conflict, between different left-wing factions and an increasingly authoritarian national government. In May 1933, the Austrian Chancellor, Engelbert Dollfuss, banned demonstrations altogether, barricading off the centre of Vienna. Tudor-Hart was arrested shortly afterwards.

Owen Logan

Edith Tudor-Hart

Owen Logan

Owen Logan was born in Edinburgh in 1963. He has worked as a freelance photographer since 1979. His work has been largely about documenting other cultures. In 1983 he began a series of pictures of the Sikh community both in Britain and abroad. His projects have concentrated on life in Morocco, published as 'Al Maghrib' (1989) and the Italian communities in Scotland, 'Bloodlines/Vite allo Specchio'. He is currently working on a complex long-term project in Nigeria, about the impact of globalisation, which involves close collaboration with Nigerians. Logan is also a contributing editor to the independent arts magazine Variant and a research fellow in the field of socio-economics at the University of Aberdeen. He lives and works in Edinburgh and Toulon.

Edith Tudor-Hart

Edith Tudor-Hart, née Suschitzky, was one of the most significant documentary photographers working in Britain in the 1930s and 1940s. Born in Vienna, she grew up in radical Jewish circles. Edith married Alex Tudor-Hart, a British doctor, and the pair moved to England. There she worked as a documentary photographer, closely associated with the Communist Party, compiling a remarkable archive of images of working people in London and later, the south of Wales. Although still active in the 1950s, the difficulties of finding work as a woman photographer led eventually to Tudor-Hart abandoning photography altogether.