Fred Bremner

Chappar Rift, Khalifat Mountain, Baluchistan (About 1889)

About this artwork

This striking, desolate landscape stands out from Fred Bremner’s other work. He has managed to convey the expanse of this desert province, something that artists and photographers of India were continually struggling to achieve. Bremner described Baluchistan as "by no means naturally fertile; nothing but barren mountains and plains to be seen except in a few places, although heavy falls of snow often cover the country during winter; but summer after summer scarcely a drop of rain is to be seen… The soil is most productive, and it is surprising to see the beauty which springs into existence, due in great measure to artificial means of watering the soil".

Fred Bremner

Fred Bremner

Fred Bremner, the son of a professional photographer in Banff, travelled to India in 1882 and worked there for nearly forty years. He moved all the time, covering vast distances to photograph colonial officers and their families as well as members of the native aristocracy. Bremner was fascinated by the Indian caste system, publishing a volume in 1897 titled 'Types of the Indian Army' illustrating the 'various races' enlisted as troops.